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Pupil Premium

Use of Pupil Premium – St Mary & St Margaret’s CE Primary School

 

Each year, we receive a Pupil Premium allocation as part of our school budget. This is currently based on the number of pupils at our school who fall into one of the following categories:

 

· Eligible for free school meals (including at any time in the past six years)

· Children in the care of a local authority or who have been adopted from care

· Children who have one or more parents serving in the armed forces

 

Our Pupil Premium allocations for the last and current financial years are shown below:

 

2015-16

2016-17

£72,869

£72,860

 

 

2015-16 – Spending of the pupil premium allocation

In 2015-16, the funding was used in the following ways:

 

 

Spending

Aims/Impact

Staffing, running and resourcing of Breakfast Club

The aims and impact of Breakfast Club are many and varied, but include the following:

· A settled, healthy start to the school day

· Improved punctuality and attendance

· Building of social skills

· Nurture / building of self-esteem

· Supporting development of reading, spelling, maths and other learning

Staffing, running and resourcing of Homework Club

As with Breakfast Club, aims are varied, but in particular focus on the following:

· Supporting development of reading, spelling, maths and other learning

· Nurture / building of self-esteem

Musical activities and support:

· Year 4 weekly whole class brass lessons leading to performances in school and at Warwick Arts Centre

· Year 5 participation in Young Voices concert at Genting Arena

· Subsidising cost of participation/performance at Speight of the Art Festival at Birmingham Town Hall (KS2)

· Subsidising peripatetic instrumental music lessons

· Staffing of free after-school choirs for KS1 and KS2

· Staffing of free after-school collaborative orchestra

 

· Ensuring all pupils have opportunity to learn (and continue to learn) a musical instrument and to develop singing skills regardless of background

· Raising children’s aspirations through performances at premier venues and through opportunities to see more advanced groups and professional musicians

· Developing pupils’ self-esteem and self-belief

· Many other documented benefits, such as improving brain function, developing social skills etc.

A contribution towards the cost of teaching and support staff for:

· In-class group support

· Out-of-class group and paired interventions

· Individual 1-to-1 support

· Improving progress, e.g. in reading, writing, mathematics (see data below) and specific areas of the curriculum

· Supporting pupils to ensure they are organised and ready to learn.

Individual subscriptions to online learning platforms:

· Mathletics

· Reading Eggs

· Spellodrome

 

· Improving progress and attainment in Reading, Mathematics and Grammar, Punctuation and Spelling

1 to 1 maths tuition

· Improving attainment in mathematics

A contribution to the cost of funding staff to provide outdoor learning to develop life skills and other learning (via Unity Trust Collaborative)

 

· Developing life skills, e.g. resilience, problem-solving

· Enhancing self-esteem

· Developing knowledge about the world

A contribution to the cost of staffing and running after school clubs:

· Cooking

· Netball

· Football

· Outdoor Learning

· Jaguar Maths Challenge

· English

· Developing healthy lifestyles

· Developing resilience, problem-solving skills etc.

· Enhancing self-esteem

· Improving attainment in English and Maths

The cost of staffing the school library at lunchtimes

 

· All pupils have access to ICT-based learning platforms regardless of home circumstances

· Developing positive attitudes to reading

Training to improve the impact of support staff and teachers

· Improved teaching skills of staff who work closely with disadvantaged children

· Improving attainment across the curriculum

Attendance package from Central School Attendance & Welfare Service Ltd

· Improving attendance of persistently absent pupils

Subsidising the cost of residential (and other) trips and other items where needed

 

· Ensuring access to all enriching learning experiences for disadvantaged pupils

· Building self-esteem

 

IMPACT OF PUPIL PREMIUM SPENDING (AS SEEN IN SCHOOL DATA)

Y1 Phonics Screen

For the past three years, our disadvantaged pupils have performed in line with national figures for all pupils:

 

Year

School Disadvantaged

National All Pupils

2016

80%

81%

2015

80%

77%

2014

75%

74%

 

This is due to a carefully structured phonics programme from entry in Nursery (or Reception). Intervention is well targeted and frequent, identified through Pupil Progress Meetings and Pupil Premium Pupil Progress Meetings.

 

KS1 and KS2 GL Assessments

Average standardised scores for disadvantaged pupils between May 2015 and March 2016 across Key Stages 1 and 2

  • Maths – increased by 1.2 points from 94.6 to 95.8, demonstrating a narrowing of the gap between disadvantaged pupils and all pupils nationally.
  • English – remained at 94.9

 

Tests in 2016 were taken somewhat earlier in the year due to a change in our annual assessment timetable. GL tell us that this will have had some effect on reducing progress; however, we were still disappointed with the consistent gap in English. We have identified a lack of reading at home to be part of the cause of this issue and are addressing this through our Reading School Improvement and Development Plan in 2016-17, e.g. through reading at homework club and breakfast club, through ensuring these pupils are target readers, through giving all pupils access to whole texts during class etc.

 

More Able Disadvantaged Pupils

Progress of More Able Disadvantaged Pupils using GL Assessments 2015-16

All more able disadvantaged pupils made expected or better than expected progress in English. Approximately ¾ of more able disadvantaged pupils made expected or better than expected progress in Maths. Of the 2 who made much lower than expected progress, one subsequently attained very highly in our Summer TestBase Optional SAT assessments and the other scored unusually highly in the initial test (not reflected in other assessments)

 

English

 

 

 

 

 

Year Group

Much lower

Lower

Expected

Higher

Much Higher

1

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

1

 

3

 

 

1

 

 

4

 

 

2

 

 

5

 

 

 

 

1

6

 

 

2

 

 

 

0

0

5

1

1

 

0%

0%

71%

14%

14%

Cum.

100%

100%

100%

29%

14%

           
           

Maths

 

 

 

 

 

Year Group

Much lower

Lower

Expected

Higher

Much Higher

1

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

1

 

 

3

 

 

1

 

 

4

1

 

1

1

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

6

 

1

 

1

 

 

1

1

3

2

0

 

14%

14%

43%

29%

0%

Cum.

100%

86%

71%

29%

0%

 

 

2016-17 – Plans for spending the pupil premium allocation

In 2016-17, we plan to use the funding in the following ways:

Spending

Aims/Impact

Staffing, running and resourcing of Breakfast Club

The aims and impact of Breakfast Club are many and varied, but include the following:

· A settled, healthy start to the school day

· Improved punctuality and attendance

· Building of social skills

· Nurture / building of self-esteem

· Supporting development of reading, spelling, maths and other learning

Staffing, running and resourcing of Homework Club

As with Breakfast Club, aims are varied, but in particular focus on the following:

· Supporting development of reading, spelling, maths and other learning

· Nurture / building of self-esteem

Musical activities and support:

· Year 4 weekly whole class brass lessons leading to performances in school and at Warwick Arts Centre

· Year 5 participation in Young Voices concert at Genting Arena

· Subsidising cost of participation/performance at Speight of the Art Festival at Birmingham Town Hall (KS2)

· Subsidising peripatetic instrumental music lessons

· Staffing of free after-school choirs for KS1 and KS2

· Staffing of free after-school collaborative orchestra

· Support for hiring of musical instruments for peripatetic lessons

· Contribution towards staffing of free in-school orchestra

 

· Ensuring all pupils have opportunity to learn (and continue to learn) a musical instrument and to develop singing skills regardless of background

· Raising children’s aspirations through performances at premier venues and through opportunities to see more advanced groups and professional musicians

· Developing pupils’ self-esteem and self-belief

· Many other documented benefits, such as improving brain function, developing social skills etc.

A contribution towards the cost of teaching and support staff for:

· In-class group support

· Out-of-class group and paired interventions

· Individual 1-to-1 support

· Improving progress, e.g. in reading, writing, mathematics (see data below) and specific areas of the curriculum

· Supporting pupils to ensure they are organised and ready to learn.

Individual subscriptions to online learning platforms:

· Mathletics

· Reading Eggs

· Spellodrome

· Literacy Planet

 

· Improving progress and attainment in Reading, Mathematics and Grammar, Punctuation and Spelling

Weekly online 1 to 1 mathematics tutoring

· Improving attainment in targeted areas of mathematics

A contribution to the cost of funding staff to provide outdoor learning to develop life skills and other learning (via Unity Trust Collaborative)

 

· Developing life skills, e.g. resilience, problem-solving

· Enhancing self-esteem

· Developing knowledge about the world

A contribution to the cost of staffing and running after school clubs:

· Coding

· Running

· Cooking

· Dodgeball

· Art

· Netball

· Football

· Outdoor Learning

· Developing healthy lifestyles

· Developing resilience, problem-solving skills etc.

· Enhancing self-esteem

· Improving attainment in English and Maths

The cost of staffing the school library at lunchtimes

 

· All pupils have access to ICT-based learning platforms regardless of home circumstances

· Developing positive attitudes to reading

Training to improve the impact of support staff and teachers

· Improved teaching skills of staff who work closely with disadvantaged children

· Improving attainment across the curriculum

Attendance package from Central School Attendance & Welfare Service Ltd

· Improving attendance of persistently absent pupils and of pupils generally

Play Therapy

· Supporting emotional needs of targeted pupils

Children’s University

· Increasing participation in extra-curricular activities and learning experiences

Subsidising the cost of residential (and other) trips and other items where needed

 

· Ensuring access to all enriching learning experiences for disadvantaged pupils

· Building self-esteem

 

Impact on Attendance

With the assistance of CSAWS, we have put in place a number of interventions and processes to improve attendance, particularly for our lowest attenders. In the first half of the school year (2016-17), 21 (46%) of disadvantaged pupils at St Mary & St Margaret’s had attended below the national average for all pupils, with 8 regarded as persistent absentees (below 90% attendance). Below are early figures suggesting a very positive impact on our disadvantaged persistent absentees:

 

 

Average attendance Autumn Term & Spring 1

(Disadvantaged persistent absentees)

Average attendance Spring Term 2 (to March 16th)

(Same pupils)

81.8%

93.8%

 

Barriers to Learning for Pupil Premium Children

At St Mary & St Margaret’s we have identified, on an individual level, a range of barriers to learning for our Pupil Premium children.  Each of our Pupil Premium children is considered individually and a range of needs have been identified.  These include:

  • Language and communication skills – children’s baseline on entry to school is broadly below national average and they need support and focussed intervention in terms of planned activities and focussed teaching.  For example we use Language Link in the Infants to identify specific areas of need and then plan appropriate teaching and intervention opportunities.
  • Personal, social skills – some children from disadvantaged backgrounds, whose parents might have had a bad experience of school, sometimes struggle to engage with school as a result of minimal parental support and engagement.  For some children this can result in difficult relationships with school, authority and their peers in terms of following rules and expectations.  A lack of an intrinsic value system impacts on a child’s ability to interact with others.  Children will sometimes have concerns around poverty that will impact on their personal ability and readiness to learn.  A child’s motivation may have other priorities that lie outside of learning in the classroom.
  • Parental engagement – occasionally parents struggle to build a quality relationship with school this can have a negative impact on a child’s ability to engage.  Lack of aspiration from parents might lead to demotivation to learning.

Other, more generic, barriers include:

  • Attendance
  • Punctuality
  • Attachment difficulties
  • Special Educational Needs
  • Physical difficulties
  • English as an additional language
  • Early childhood neglect and lack of experiences
  • Trauma
  • Neglect
  • Young carers
  • Loss and bereavement
  • Mental health issues
  • Medical diagnoses
  • Parental substance and alcohol misuse
  • Domestic violence
  • External influences, including use of social media
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